Tag Archives: God’s calling

I am qualified

Qualified.

This is my word right now. It’s the word I chose to stand under for the whole of 2018. Because the truth is most days I feel pretty unqualified. Unqualified to raise these three humans entrusted to me. Unqualified to lead by example, to teach them how to build a strong marriage rooted in love and honesty and forgiveness; teach them how to put Jesus at the center of their lives.

I struggle to claim words like “writer” and “ministry leader” because don’t you need to have a diploma with these words on them or get a paycheck for doing them before you can be them? I don’t, so I am unqualified.

I struggle to claim the words instructional designer or teacher when I’ve been developing curriculum and delivering training professionally for 2 years. Because it’s not what I went to school for, I am unqualified.

But then I realize the truth is that even with a Master’s Degree in Marketing and 15 years experience building and managing websites, I never felt completely qualified to call myself a subject matter expert in online marketing.

I could spend hours trying to figure out why I struggle to claim these things. To feel qualified. But the bottom line is we all know that God doesn’t call the qualified, He qualifies the called.

So right now I’m working to claim it. To own my calling and lean on heavenly qualification.

God gave me these three children to raise and love and teach. I am qualified to be their mother.

God brought this man into my life and called us into marriage. I am qualified to be his wife.

God gave me words and a deep-seated desire to write them down and share them with others. I am qualified to be a writer.

God gave me a heart for women, for leading retreats, and speaking truth and hope and light into other’s lives. I am qualified to lead a ministry.

God led me to a second career as a training designer and manager, a job I love and work at every day. I am qualified for it.

And whatever is next. Whatever God whispers to my heart and guides me toward. I will be qualified. Not because of what I’ve done, but because of Who does the qualifying.

What’s your word?

 

photo credit: IRRphotography A Writers Desk via photopin (license)

 

Who am I?

“But Moses said to God, ‘Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?'” – Exodus 3:11

This was Moses’s response to God when He called Moses to lead the Israelites out of Egypt. It was the first of several creative excuses or arguments as to why he wasn’t qualified, ending with a raw and honest plea for God to pick another…anyone but him.

“Pardon your servant Lord, but please send someone else.” (Exodus 4:13)

This past Sunday I stood up in front of our little congregation at church and taught about these verses. About God’s call to Moses; about Exodus 3:1-4:19. I went through each verse and discussed the importance of trusting God’s plan, remembering that God will use us for His purposes, even if we don’t feel qualified. We examined how Moses let his fear and self-doubt almost lead to missing his calling. I encouraged everyone who would listen not to let fear get in the way of answering God’s call. I reminded my church family that it’s not about us and our qualifications, but about God’s plan, His power, and His presence.

I have a special place in my heart for this section of scripture. And I believe every word I said.

But then Monday came. And I found myself alone in my bedroom, sobbing, feeling inadequate, less-than, and incapable. I asked God if He is really calling me into ministry; is that really His plan? And if it is, am I really equipped for that call? Who am I to stand before others and teach them Your word?

I know this routine well by now, having taught a handful of Sunday services and leading a few women’s retreats. It’s what I refer to as the “day after attack.”

When I speak or teach I feel the presence of the Holy Spirit, and in that moment it feels palpable and beautiful, like God is doing something big and letting me be a part of it. But then Monday morning comes. And I return to my normal routine, working my normal job, packing normal lunches, looking at my normal reflection staring back at me in the mirror.

And the enemy whispers in my ear: who are you? What makes you think you are qualified to teach others? I recall the yawns and bored looks during my talk. I remember the surprised expression on the neighbor’s face when they found out I was teaching at church (you know the kind of surprise that says “what are they thinking?” not “isn’t that wonderful!”). I recount every person or article that’s declared women aren’t supposed to preach God’s word. I play back the recording of my message and cringe at every “ummm” and “uhhh”, seeing every flaw, hearing every flub.

And the enemy says, “See? You are not very good. You are not anything special.”

I think of all the practical reasons I cannot answer this call. I need seminary training. That costs money. I’m still paying off that Master’s Degree in Marketing and Communication, a degree I’ll never use if I go into ministry. I have a family to support, kids to put through school. We love our town, we can’t move just so I can go to school. Maybe in a few years…maybe when the kids are out of the house….maybe.

And the enemy says, “You’ll never be ready for this. You are just a middle-aged woman who wishes she was being called to serve God in some big way, but that is not your life.”

I am not equipped. Please, Lord, will you call someone else? Someone smarter, stronger, younger, older, richer, better?

And then the irony of this day-after beat-down by Satan and my own insecurities strikes me. I can’t even go 24 hours without succumbing to the very thing I just encouraged 45 other people to resist.

There is one thing that gives me hope, though. The fact that God never gave up on Moses. Even after he tried to deny his call five times, even though he was 80 years old, God still used Moses for the good of His plan. Even though Moses didn’t speak well and needed his brother’s help, even though Moses got overwhelmed when the Israelites complained and fought, God still used Moses to lead His people. Even though Moses lost his temper, even though he continued to questioned God’s plan along the way, God still spoke to Moses. He still loved Moses.

I know I’m not equipped to do anything. And, honestly? I don’t know exactly how God plans to use me. But I cling to the knowledge that He will use me in His time, according to His purpose.

He will never give up on me.

When God creates extraordinary out of the everyday ordinary

Do you ever feel like God is calling you to do extraordinary things, but then you look around and feel like your life is as ordinary as they come? I know I do. And sometimes that call in my heart leads to dissatisfaction in my daily life. I imagine whatever it is God’s calling me for, it can’t possibly look like this.

By day, I work in corporate marketing for a big IT company. While it’s mostly been a rewarding and successful career, I never really planned to be here. Late at night, as I lie awake in bed, I hear God whispering into my heart, calling my name, and I wonder how my daily work is amounting to much of anything special. I wonder why He’s calling me: a wife and mother of three, with a regular old corporate job. I’m not a Bible scholar; I didn’t go to seminary; I’m not on the front lines of the mission field. Yet I feel it vibrate through my entire being – God is calling my name.

I will tell you honestly, I’ve struggled for much of the last two years thinking there must be something more God wants me to do. Some way to serve Him that’s bigger and bolder! While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to serve God in big and bold ways, the problem comes when you use a worldly definition of “big” and “bold” and miss what God has put right in front of you. That’s where I was up until last month when I attended a Christian women’s conference. It was during this weekend that I finally woke up and heard God say “look for the everyday opportunities to minister, and I will use them in extraordinary ways.”

The rest of this post can be read over at my friend Joy A. Williams blog: www.joyawilliams.com/extraordinary/